DeSantis announced anti-drug campaign led by first lady

Gov. Ron DeSantis announced the launch of first lady Casey DeSantis’ anti-drug campaign, “The Facts. Your Future.,” on Friday in Seminole, according to a press release from the governor’s office.

SEMINOLE — Gov. Ron DeSantis announced the launch of first lady Casey DeSantis’ anti-drug campaign, “The Facts. Your Future.,” on Friday in Seminole, according to a news release from the governor’s office.

This program directly engages youth in Florida to improve their understanding of the life-altering effects of drug abuse and empower teens to reach their full potential. Through a series of school assemblies, “The Facts. Your Future.” will provide an interactive space for schools to educate their students on the impacts of substance abuse.

“Substance abuse is one the major reasons some of our youth fail to reach their true potential,” DeSantis said from Seminole High School. “As the first lady continues to advocate and support Florida’s youth, this new initiative is another key step to protect and educate our children. We must ensure teens across our state have the tools and knowledge to make good decisions that will positively impact the rest of their lives.”

“ ‘The Facts. Your Future.’” empowers Florida students with the facts needed to make informed decisions for their future,” Casey DeSantis said. “The earlier teens start using drugs, the greater their chances of continuing to use them and developing substance abuse problems later in life.”

Schools across the state will be provided with the resources to host their own assemblies, with campaign materials to continue essential conversations throughout the school year. 

In July, the State Board of Education adopted student performance standards on substance abuse prevention. This program will help support the schools and educators in meeting state requirements for instruction in substance abuse prevention. The standards give students an opportunity to develop an awareness of the dangers associated with the use and abuse of harmful substances and develop essential knowledge and skills that promote a drug-free lifestyle.

“The human brain does not finish developing until the mid- to late 20s, and areas responsible for controlling impulses develop last,” said Dr. Joseph Ladapo, the state’s surgeon general. “Teens need to understand the long-term effects of substance use in order to make sound decisions, and youth who engage in drug use have a higher chance of addiction later in life.”

“The dangers of substance use and abuse are clear,” said Commissioner of Education Richard Corcoran. “Not only can they ruin a child’s life, they can end it as well.”

The program is an opportunity to save lives and prevent tragedies through education. 

“Our goal is to provide students with a world-class education that helps students become great citizens,” Corcoran said.